Growing Guides

Grow with us! Here at EarthBox, we want to make sure you are getting the most out of your container gardening experience. We’ve made a variety growing guides for common backyard crops– and we’re excited to share them with you. Click any below to learn how to grow them yourself!

Artichokes

Though Artichokes are usually grown in California, home gardeners nearly anywhere can have great success growing them with the right care. Artichoke plants are perennial flowers, but can be grown as annuals with plenty of delicious buds. You can either grow them from a seed or a crown--the latter taking much less time than starting them from seed. Artichoke plants favor mild winters and cool, moist summers. If you see gray mold on the Artichoke leaves, simply remove the infected leaves.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Slugs

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Gray Mold, Powdery Mildew

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Beans & Peas

Beans are highly-productive, easy-to-grow crops. Pole beans and peas are tall, vining crops that will need trellising support, such as the Staking System. Pole beans and peas continue producing throughout the growing season, allowing for ongoing harvests and fresh vegetables to eat with lunch or dinner every few days. Frequent harvesting of pole beans helps ensure that the plants keep producing. Bush beans, such as soybeans, don’t need much support since they are more robust and compact. Bush bean crops usually mature all at once, which means you'll wind up with a very large harvest at the end of the growing season. Since bush bean crops reach maturity all at the same time, they are perfect to grow if you wish to preserve several batches by freezing or canning to use at a later date. Harvest any beans or peas when they are just full and average-size. Letting them get too large can result in tough, "woody" beans with decreased flavor.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Mexican Bean Beetles, Japanese Beetles, Cucumber Beetles

SUCEPTIBLE TO: White Mold, Mosaic Virus, Fusarium Wilt, Blossom Drop

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Beets

Beets are a great starter vegetable since they are easy to grow and require very little garden maintenance. This nutritous crop prefers cooler weather, even a light frost, and do not tolerate heat very well. Beets should be harvested once they are approximately two inches in diameter. Allowing them to grow larger will result in reduced sweetness and a more fibrous root. Your harvest from this crop will be versatile--beetroots can be boiled or roasted to be eaten hot or cold, thinly sliced and turned into chips with a dehydrator, or pickled to enjoy as a tasty treat at a later time. Young, tender beet leaves can also be harvested throughout the growing season for use in salads. Any stems or skins can be used to naturally dye eggs a bright pink color.

COMMON PESTS: Flea Beetles, Leaf Hoppers, Leaf Miner, Rove Beetle

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Blight, Western Yellow Virus, Leaf Spot, Damping Off, Curly Top, Downy Mildew, Fusarium Wilt, Scab

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Broccoli

Broccoli, an easily-recognizeable vegetable, can be a successful crop in your garden with timely planting and good protection from pests. This cool-season crop grows best in spring or fall--avoid planting in mid-summer as hot weather can cause premature bolting in broccoli, but keep in mind it requires full sun to avoid slow maturity. Beware of pests and diseases popular with other vegetables in the cabbage family. Placing insect netting over your crops until they are ready for harvest should help keep pests at bay. This classic, nutrient-rich veggie can be enjoyed raw, steamed, roasted, fried, or in soups.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Flea Beetles, Cabbageworms, Whiteflies

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Clubroot, Bolting, Nitrogen deficiency

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Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are easy-to-grow and won’t take up much space in your garden footprint. Like other cole crops, Brussels sprouts are a nitrogen hog, and require consitent watering and cool temperatures. Brussels sprouts are best planted mid-summer for a fall harvest. These tasty morsels grow on a stalk and can be easily picked once the knobby sprouts are one inch wide, harvesting from the bottom first. Why Brussels sprouts are vilfied is unknown, as they have a similar taste to that of cabbage and are delicious when roasted or carmelized. Keep pests away with insect netting, and watch temperatures so your crop does not bolt.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Flea Beetles, Cabbageworms, Armyworm, Cabbage White, Leaf Miners, Cabbage Looper, Slugs, Snails, Whiteflies, Thrips

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Damping Off, Clubroot, Downy Mildew, Powdery Mildew, Leaf Spot, Verticilium Wilt, White Mold, Rot, Bolting

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Cabbage

Like most other cole crops, cabbage grows best where there is a cool fall growing season with light frosts. Cabbage is a water and nutrient hog, requiring a high nitrogen and potassium fertilizer. Cabbage is ready for harvest when heads are firm. It is common for a second smaller head to form if enough of the stem was left intact from the initial harvest. This versatile crop can be made into cole slaw or sauerkraut, stuffed, braised, added to soup, or sauteed.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Flea Beetles, Slugs, Cabbageworms, Cabbage Loopers

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Black rot, clubroot

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Carrots

With some careful planning and attention, carrots are a snap to grow. These Vitamin A-rich veggies require a fertilizer that is low in nitrogen, and high in phosphorus. They do best when planted from seed rather than transplants, and thinning is imperative to prevent twisted or crooked roots. Carrots grow very well in peat-based growing media; do not require a heavy amount of water, but perform well in consistently moist soils--which make them ideal for growing in the EarthBox gardening system. You're more likely to find four-footed critters rather than buggy pests around this crop--deer, rabbits, and woodchucks can all destroy this delectable crop. Once harvested, carrots can be stored for more than a month in the refridgerator. Freezing and canning are also great ways to preserve this sweet harvest for a later consumption.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Flea Beetles, Leaf Hoppers, Carrot Rust Flies

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Damping Off, Downy Mildew, Powdery mildew, Blight, Yellow Disease, Black Rot

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Cauliflower

Cauliflower is a cool-season crop, partially hardy to frost and light freezes, and can be grown wherever there are cool growing seasons. When planting your cauliflower, choose a spot in full sun. If it is an unusually warm day, you can move your container into shade. Water is critical in the beginning of the season while it may still be a bit warm outside. Cauliflower is affected by pests like other members of the cabbage family. Repel flea beetles and root maggots on young seedlings by covering your containers with insect nets immediately after planting. This versatile veggie can be used as a carb substitute for rice or cous cous, and can even be made into gluten-free pizza crust.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Cabbageworms, Harlequin bugs

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Clubroot, Black rot

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Celery

Some gardeners will find growing celery difficult, as it has a longer growing season, and can be a bit finicky with a high level of temperature sensitivity. Celery needs ample sun, plenty of water, and balanced nutrients for fast growth. Celery can be started indoors before the season, or sown directly as a summer crop. It may require some additional support to keep the bunches together while growing. While celery is hardy to light freezes, daytime temperaturess should ideally stay moderate. To prevent pests, use insect netting early in the season. Celery diseases are rarely an issue in home gardens. Once harvested, celery should be used rather quickly. Enjoy as a crunchy snack with veggie dip or sunbutter. To use your harvest at a later time, it is best to incorporate your celery in some broth-based soups which can be frozen or canned.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Wihteflies

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Bolting, Mosaic Virus, Fusarium Wilt

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Collard Greens

The best environment to grow collard green or mustard greens is in full sun with plentiful, consistent moisture to thrive in your garden. Greens are frost tolerant, so growing them as a late season crop is ideal. Planting greens can also be done in early spring for a summer harvest, but more watering is likely necessary for them to grow successfully during the summer heat. Use insect netting to help protect from early insect infestations. Collards are best consumed in gumbo, braised, or sauteed.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Wihteflies

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Bolting, Mosaic Virus, Fusarium Wilt

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Corn

Perhaps one of the sweetest rewards in your garden, sweet corn is a warm-season crop sensitive to frost and light freezes. Remember to plant your seeds with at least 3 months of warm, sunny weather ahead. Choose a location with full sun and remember to keep the water reservoir filled for these heavy drinkers. Corn smut, a disfiguring parasitic fungus that forms large "boils" on stalks, leaves, tassels, or ears can be a major issue for corn. It’s important to cut off the boils before they burst, as the spores are viable for 5-7 years, and can ruin future crops planted in the same gardening system. While delicious, corn has little nutrients to offer, but can be used in any number of ways to eat.

COMMON PESTS: Flea Beetles, Cucumber Beetles, Stink Bugs

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Corn Smut

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Cucumbers

Cucumbers are an easy to grow and prolific crop. Ensure the reservoir is kept full, otherwise they may end up being bitter if they don't receive enough moisture. Always wait to plant your cucumber plants until the weather is consistently warm, since they are highly sensitive to cold. You can use frost covers to speed warming and protect plants from pests at the same time. Remove the covers before temperatures get too hot in midsummer, and to allow for pollination. Cucumber beetles are the largest problem with this crop. Cucumbers are best when they are picked at a small to moderate size, otherwise larger ones become woody and tasteless. Consume your harvest within a few days, or pickle them to enjoy at a later time.

COMMON PESTS: Cucumber Beetle, Whiteflies

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Lack of Pollination, Bacterial Wilt, Anthracnose, Mosaic Virus

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Eggplants

Eggplants are a unique fruit that grow best in full sun and hot weather. Like other members of the Nightshade family, eggplants should not be planted until all danger of frost has passed, and daytime temperatures are consistently warm. Be certain to use the black side of the mulch covers to speed soil warming and early growth. These globe-like fruits tend to produce very well in containers, especially if overnight temperatures are warm. If a cold spell is expected, use a frost cover to protect plants, or bring them indoors. Check water levels daily, since eggplants are heavy drinkers, and fruit may become bitter of they do not receive adequate water. Flea beetles are the most common pest, leaving tiny holes all over the plants' large leaves. When harvesting, be sure to use pruners, since the stems will not release the fruit without destroying the plant.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Flea Beetles, Spider Mites, Tomato Hornworms, Colorado Potato Beetles

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Downy Mildew, Powdery Mildew

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Garlic

Garlic is a relatively easy to grow crop - each clove planted will yield one whole bulb when harvested. Even watering is important, especially during bulbing (mid-May through June). Garlic has very few pest issues in the garden and it can actually serve as a natural pest repellent. Like onions, garlic can be added to nearly any dish to add robust flavor, or it can be roasted and used as a savory spread. Be sure to let garlic bulbs dry after harvesting, and they will keep for several months.

COMMON PESTS: None

SUCEPTIBLE TO: White Rot, Mosaic Virus

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Lettuce

Nothing tastes better than a fresh, crisp salad made with lettuce straight from the garden. Head lettuces are lettuce varieties that form together like a cabbage such as Romaine and Iceberg. Home grown lettuce tends to be higher in flavor and nutrients than the store-bought variety, and can be very easy to grow yourself. Lettuce likes a lot of water and prefers cool growing conditions, as it can bolt in higher temperatures. Keep an eye on your lettuce plants during warmer weather, if the leaves are wilting, you’ll need to move them to a shady spot immediately. Growing nasturtiums near your lettuce can naturally help keep damaging aphids away.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Earwigs, Slugs, Snails

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Anthracnose, Downy Mildew, Powdery mIldew, Leaf Spot, Rot, White Mold

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Herbs

The many varieties of herbs are easy to grow and very prolific. Some are more hearty and shrub-like such as rosemary, thyme, sage, and oregano; others are more delicate and prone to wilting or bolting when subjected to extreme heat such as dill, parsley, cilantro, and chives. Growing herbs such as mint or lavender in containers is beneficial because it won't have an opportunity to spread--as these tend to be invasive and difficult to rid your garden of. Herbs keep producing as long as you continue pruning and harvesting. They can be used fresh or dried to add flavor to any number of dishes.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Flea Beetles, Slugs

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Bolting, Powdery Mildew, Downy Mildew, Anthracnose, Damping Off

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Jicama

Jicama is a delicious, but uncommon root vegetable from Central America. Like a lot of root vegetables, it takes a full season to grow, over five months. If you’re feeling adventurous and are dying to try something new in the garden, jicama might just be the answer. Best grown from seed, Jicama prefers very warm climates with full sun. Support climbing vines with a Staking System. Make sure to cut, or deadhead, the flowers to encourage root growth. Jicama tends to be a pest-free plant, due to the poisonous properties of everything that grows above the soil--only the root is edible, so it is very important that you keep this plant away from children and pets. The root can be eaten raw and tastes like a water chestnut.

COMMON PESTS: None

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Lack of Nitrogen

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Kale

Unlike some vegetables, kale is an exceptionally cold-tolerant crop. A little bit of frost may even serve to make the crop sweeter. In addition to preferring cold weather, make sure your crop is planted in a sunny spot and you keep the reservoir filled. Kale is a nutrient-rich vegetable that can be steamed, baked as chips, used in soup, mixed into di, or frozen for use at a later time.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Flea Beetles, Cabbage Looper, Armyworm, Cabbage White, Thrips

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Leaf Spot, Anthracnose, Damping Off, Downy Mildew

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Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi is a cool-weather vegetable that prefers full-sun and consistently-moist growing media for quick growth. Kohlrabi that goes without water will become woody. Do not overcrowd your EarthBox gardening system, as kohlrabi has large roots that need a lot of room as they grow. Kohlrabi is prone to the typical cabbage family pests, but insect netting may be used early on to help prevent an infestation. This often-overlooked crop has a mild cabbage flavor, and the texture or consistency to that of a broccoli stem. It can be eaten raw, steamed, or roasted; or it can be used in stir fry or soup. Kohlrabi greens can also be eaten in salads.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Cabbage White, Cabbage Looper, Armyworm, Thrips

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Damping Off, Clubroot, Powdery Mildew, Leaf Spot, Black Rot

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Leeks

Leeks are a cool season crop hardy to frosts and light freezes, and are relatively pest and disease free. Being in the same family as onions, shallots, scallions, and garlic--leeks are milder and sweeter than their counterparts and are jam-packed with tons of nutritional benefits. Leeks should be harvested when they are no more than 1-1 1/2 inches in diameter, since any larger will often be fibrous. They will keep up to 2 weeks after harvesting if left unwashed and stored in the refrigerator. Leeks can be enjoyed sauteed, braised, pureed into soup, or thinly sliced in salads.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Cabbage White, Cabbage Looper, Armyworm, Thrips

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Damping Off, Clubroot, Powdery Mildew, Leaf Spot, Black Rot

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Melons

Melons are very fragile to frost and light freezes; and require both warm days and nights to produce fruit. While they are very thirsty plants, some gardeners prefer to stop providing water during the last week before fruits are ripened to prevent bland fruit. Since melons like consistently warm conditions, frost covers will help for earlier crops and better yields, especially in cooler climates. Frost covers, when used immediately after planting, will also help protect against cucumber beetles. To prevent diseases, keep melons off the ground and let them grow vertically on the Staking System instead. Once fruit begins growing, provide a sling under heavy melons to help support and distribute weight so they do not drop off the trellis. While best enjoyed fresh, pieces of fruit may be frozen so they can be blended into smoothies at a later time.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Cucumber Beetles, Squash Vine Borer

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Fusarium Wilt

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Okra

Okra is a perfect crop to grow if you live in a climate with very hot summers. Growing okra requires a lot of sunshine, so find a place in your garden that gets all day sun. Plant okra after all threats of frost have passed. Keep the plants well-watered throughout the summer months and use more if you are in a hot, arid region. Keep an eye out for common garden pests like aphids and stink bugs. Okra is a very prolific plant, yielding many abundant hravests. Use okra in gumbo or middle-Eastern inspired dishes; or enjoy it roasted, satueed, or fried.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Corn earworms, Stinkbugs

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Fusarium Wilt

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Onions

When planting onions in your EarthBox, make sure you situate them in full sun. Onions are shallow rooted and grow best with steady watering, especially during the bulbing phase. Adequate air circulation helps reduce the risk of foliage disease. Keep an eye out for onion maggot, whose hatched larvae crawl into the bulb and feed on the roots, stem, and developing bulb which will destroy your crop. With their unique flavors--some strong and overpowering, some mild and sweet--onions can be added to nearly any dish and can be cooked every way, as well as eaten raw.

COMMON PESTS: Thrips, Leaf Miners, Onion Maggot

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Damping Off, Black Mold, Fusarium Wilt, Downy Mildew, Rot, Smut, White Rot

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Peppers

The many varieties of sweet and hot peppers thrive on full sun and warm weather. Cold temperatures can weaken pepper plants and they may never fully recover, so don’t rush to plant in the spring. Be certain to use the black side of the mulch covers to speed soil warming and early growth, but be careful, as they can also overheat the plants in certain climates. Peppers can be temperamental if temperatures are too hot or too cool. Nighttime temperatures below 60°F or above 75°F can reduce fruit set. Peppers need a steady supply of water for their best performance, so be sure to check water levels each day. Like tomatoes, you may find blossom end rot on your peppers, which can be easily corrected. Peppers are prone to sun scald, so moving them to partial shade can help if temperatures become too hot. Sweet peppers can be cut up and eaten raw, roasted and marinated, sauteed; or used in stews, soups, and stir fry. Hot peppers can be pickled, added to stew, used in stir fry, and are excellent when dried and ground to be used as a seasoning to give nearly any dish a little kick.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Flea Beetles

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Mosaic Virus, Blossom End Rot, Sun Scald

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Pumpkins

Pumpkins aren’t difficult to grow, but do require a bit of planning for success. Since their vines can grow 20 feet and they are prone to mildew, a Staking System for vertical support is recommended to keep fruit off the wet ground and allow for good air circulation. You will want to make sure this crop receives direct sunlight every day, and that temperatures are consistenly hot. Once your pumpkins have been planted, preventunwanted pests by covering them with insect netting up until four weeks. Since pumpkins and gourds tend to be heavy drinkers, fill the water reservoir 2-3 times per day once fruit appears on the vines.

COMMON PESTS: Cucumber Beetle, Squash Bug, Squash Vine Borer, Aphids

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Powdery Mildew, Bacterial Wilt, Anthracnose, Lack of Pollination

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Radishes

Radishes are a fast growing cool-season crop that require a spot in full sun. They should be kept well-watered to promote uninterrupted growth. Since they mature quickly, radishes are ideal for succession planting to ensure you have them constantly ready to harvest. They should be picked when their leaves are approximately four inches long, which will ensure this piquant root is packed with flavor and not woody or tasteless. T oavoid pests early on, use insect netting immediately after planting. Radishes add a zesty kick to fresh salads, are great for snacking on with some dip or salad dressing, make an excellent addition to simple tea sandwiches, and can be easily pickled.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Flea Beetles, Harlequin Bugs, Cabbage Loopers, Root Maggots

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Damping Off, Clubroot, Blight, Downy Mildew, Fusarium Wilt, Scab, Bolting

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Rutabagas

Rutabagas, originally a cross between cabbage and turnips, are a tasty root crop that can be produced in the spring or fall, growing best in cooler temperatures--weather that is too hot will cause the roots to become bitter and woody. Not only are the roots delicious and filled with vitamins, but the tops can be prepared and enjoyed like any common green and pack even more of a nutritious punch. Once harvested, these hardy roots can be stored all winter if kept properly.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Flea Beetles

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Anthracnose, Leaf Spot, Black Rot, Downy Mildew

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Salad Greens

Don’t forget to add greens to your garden! These easy-to-grow veggies will tolerate a wide variety of conditions. Like other leafy vegetables,salad greens prefer cool conditions but should be kept in direct sun. Often, they are hardy enough to over-winter in many locations, from late summer and early fall sowings. These plants are ideal for growing in the EarthBox gardening system since plenty of water helps promote rapid, uninterrupted growth, and slows bolting.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Cabbage Loopers, Slugs, Snails, Flea Beetles, Leaf Miners, Thrips

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Damping Off, Downy Mildew, Rust, Leaf Spot, Rot

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Spinach

Spinach, an easy to grow crop that fills in very quickly, is hardy to frosts and light freezes. Spinach can bolt if it becomes too dry or if the temperature outside warms. While it does need consistent watering, it doesn't require too many nutrients - making it ideal for a fall planting after you're done harvesting your warm-weather crops. An excellent source of vitamins, spinach can be eaten raw or cooked; and is a great addition to soup, stir fry, or pasta. To preserve spinach, blanch and freeze for later use in dips or sauces.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Leaf Miners

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Bolting, Mosaic Virus, Downy Mildew

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Strawberries

Once established, strawberry plants can produce berries well for up to three years. They perform best when harvested lightly the first year, but should fruit heavily the next two years. Strawberry plants produce the best yields in full sun with consistent watering. The sweetest thing about strawberries is that picking ripe berries often helps keep the plants fruiting. Strawberries can be consumed in any number of ways: fresh, in smoothies, preserves, pies and cakes, covered in sweets, or cooked and served over ice cream.

COMMON PESTS: Slugs, Spider Mites, Japanese Beetles

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Gray Mold, Powdery Mildew

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Summer Squash

Summer Squash - a broad term used to describe soft squash varieties such as zucchini and patty pan squash—is a warm-season crop that can be grown almost anywhere in full sun. Wait until any threat of frost has passed and the soil has warmed to about 70 F before planting, as these tender squash varieties are extremely sensitive to frost and light freezes. Perfect for containers, most summer squash grow on short, compact vines that don’t require trellising or staking, unlike the sprawling vines of most winter squash and pumpkins. Rather than growing baseball bat-sized zucchini—which can be bland, full of seeds, and woody—harvest squash when fruit is small and tender and your plants will keep producing right up to frost.

COMMON PESTS: ACucumber Beetle, Aphids, Stink Bug, Squash Bug, Squash Vine Borer

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Lack of Pollination, Blossom End Rot

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Swiss Chard

Chard prefers full sun early in the growing season, and partial shade in summer when it’s warmest. It requires consistent water, especially when the plants grow large or during hot dry spells in the summer. Aphids, slugs, and leaf miners love chard, but can be controlled easily by disposing of the affected leaves or hosing pests away with a blast of water. Don’t forget to look underneath leaves for rows of pearl-white eggs, which will need to be destroyed. Beer traps or a ring of salt around your EarthBox will help prevent slugs from ruining this nutritious crop. Chard can be used the same way as spinach, and the hearty, brightly-colored stems can be pickled. Preserve chard by blanching and freezing, or use a dehydrator and add flakes to soups later on.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Slugs, Flea Beetles, Rove Beetle, Leaf Miners

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Damping Off, Bolting, Curly Top, Black Rot

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Tomatoes

Tomatoes are a relatively easy fruit to grow, and are a delicious summertime treat best enjoyed straight from the garden. Plant them in a sunny location once all danger of frost has passed. Remember to set up your Staking System right away, to avoid a headache later on, since proper support helps keep the plants healthy and producing. Tomatoes come in two types: determinate and indeterminate. Determinate are better known as “bush” or “patio” varieties, and have a set-size that they will grow to, making them ideal for shorter growing seasons or small spaces. Fruit on a determinate tomato plant sets and ripens all at once. Indeterminate varieties, such as cherry or grape tomatoes, will continue to grow and produce throughout the season; until the plant is eventually killed by frost or runs out of nutrients. Be sure to always supply tomatoes with added calcium to prevent Blossom End Rot. Consistently check water levels throughout the day, since tomato plants are very heavy drinkers and require a lot of water. The most common pest is the Tomato Hornworm, which can destroy your crops with its voracious appetite. Check plants regularly and pick any off by hand. Hornworms that have rice-looking eggs on them may be left alone; as this indicates the hornworm has become a host for parasitic wasp eggs, and it will eventually die.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Flea Beetles, Tomato Hornworms, Whiteflies, Potato Beetle, Mosquitoes, Stink Bugs

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Blossom End Rot, Splitting, Cat-facing, Magnesium Deficiency, Mosaic Virus, Early/Late Blight, Bacterial Spot/Speck, Verticilum Wilt, Fusarium Wilt, Canker, Black Mold, Gray Mold, Yellow Leaf Curl Disease

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Turnips

Turnips, when planted during the correct time, are easy to grow and mature quickly, allowing for several succession-planted crops during the growing season. The mild, sweet flesh of these roots can be eaten raw or cooked, and your harvest will keep for more than a month if stored properly. Turnips need a consistenly-watered environment to grow quickly, making the EarthBox gardening system perfect for these little white and purple globes. Like other cabbage family crops, turnips are rahter prone to pests and disease, so careful inspection of your crop is essential.

COMMON PESTS: Aphids, Flea Beetles

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Damping Off, Downy Mildew, Powdery Mildew, Anthracnose, Leaf Spot, White Mold, Black Root, Black Rot, Mosaic Virus, Clubroot

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Winter Squash

Winter Squash—a broad term used to describe hearty vining squash varieties such as butternut, acorn, and spaghetti squash—is a warm-season crop that can be grown almost anywhere in full sun and with proper support. To prevent diseases, keep squash off the ground and let them grow vertically on the Staking System. Once fruit begins growing, tie a sling to the trellis net under heavy squash to help support and distribute weight so they do not drop off the vine. Once harvested in late summer or early fall, fruit can be kept for several months and enjoyed in soups and stews through the winter if stored in a cool, dark place.

COMMON PESTS: Cucumber Beetle, Aphids, Stink Bug, Squash Bug, Squash Vine Borer

SUCEPTIBLE TO: Lack of Pollination, Blossom End Rot

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